$11-Million Gift to Shape Future of Veterinary Care

Brendon:
“Before, I was using drugs. I just didn’t have any motivation to get better. It just wasn’t a goal of mine at the time. Then I met Bentley and he gave me motivation. He got me out of the house. He always kept a smile on my face and he cuddles with me at night.”

Dr. Shane Bateman:
“Veterinary medicine, I think, is very focused currently on supporting the usual clientele that we have. But we’ve sort of neglected a whole segment of our community and of the population who in some ways depend on that human-animal bond even more so than the average citizen does.”

Dr. Jeffrey Wichtel:
“We see vulnerable populations of pets and indeed their owners every day. We see it on the street, we see it in rural communities, we see it in our neighborhood.”

Brendon:
“Previously, I was homeless. I couldn’t afford anything. That’s what made me almost not want to get the dog because I was like ‘I’m gonna be a bad owner. All I have is time for him’.”

Kim Lang:
“First animal I ever had were dogs. My first horse came I guess when I was about eight. I’ve always loved being with the horses and I’ve loved just being in the barn with them and working with them and everything. It was always like that, even as a child. The rescues, most of them came when we bought our farm, that was over 30 years ago. There’d be like five dogs and nine cats in the house. Some dogs just came up our lane and they were just lost and I was able to find their their owners.”

Dr. Franco Vaccarino:
“Patera Veterinary College is really at the forefront of the latest advances in research, latest advances in teaching, but ultimately this is about making this knowledge actionable and connecting this knowledge with the community.”

Dr. Jeffrey Wichtel:
“So, this generous gift will provide the foundation for us to purchase the equipment and hire the personnel to deliver this program. But it will also fund a professorship. We’ll study the very best ways to offer access to populations of animals that would not normally get access to veterinary healthcare. The University of Guelph is all about connecting communities. There’s a large community of people out there who are trying to serve animals who are in need of veterinary healthcare. This gift is going to permit us to build partnerships to those organizations so that they have a pipeline of veterinarians and staff who can help them deliver on these programs in the future.”

Dr. Shane Bateman:
“Being able to take students into some of the situation’s that we do work in opens their eyes.”

Taylor Morris:
“These clinics just they make you feel like you’re able to make a bigger impact somewhere else.”

Darren Graham:
“It’s not just a business, it’s much more than that. Just seeing that stripped-down kind of like a guerilla unit services that were being provided was a really interesting experience. To just strip away all the shiny tech and all that stuff and just kind of get down to helping people.

Taylor Morris:
“It has been the best experience that I’ve been involved with and I wouldn’t change it for the world.”

Dr. Jeffrey Wichtel:
“Certainly, animals in our local region will benefit from preventative care and medical care that’s offered by our students and our staff. But the real impact occurs through our graduates who leave here and offer these kind of services in the community in which they finally practice.”

Dr. Franco Vaccarino:
“For me, the word that jumps to mind is ‘gratitude’ and thanks to Kim and Stu Lang for their thoughtfulness, generosity, and confidence in the university.”

Dr. Shane Bateman:
“Emotion comes very quickly when I think about what this gift to us is going to be capable of. It will change so many lives and I can’t even begin to think of the good that will come from what’s happened.”

Kim Lang:
“There’s something that really resonates with people when they’re doing something really good. Vets have that opportunity to go out there and make the world so much better.”